The Canterbury Tales: The Parson

Occupation 

   A Parson is member of the clergy, a minister, pastor, or rector. He, unlike the monk or friar, he practices what he preaches. He offers help, and money to his parishioners, no matter who they are, or what the situation. He serves as a role-model, and protector for his parishioners. He helps them avoid sin, and doesn't hesitate to punish them when they do.

Physical Description

The Parson is very poor, so he probably wears

very simple, plain clothing. He probably doesn't smile

much, because he is a very serious, and a firm person. He's also probably in good shape, because of the long walks he takes to visit his followers.   



Intelligence/Education

 The is depicted as intelligent and sensible. The general prologue says, " He was a learned man also, Devoutly his parishioners he would teach." He is wise as well, the prologue describes him as, "Patient is adversity, and well content.  





Background History:

The Parson is from the country, and poor. But the wealth that he lacked from money, he made up for by being rich in holy thought, and hardworking. The Parson had faced a lot of hard times and adversity in his life, and uses it as fuel to teach his parishioners. While most people in his position would require a fee for their service, the Parson did the opposite, he would give his poorer church members money, and some of his possessions. Which often made it harder for him to get by.   

Unknown Vocabulary 

The Parson says that he hates using excommunication to force people to make offerings, an excommunication in the church is a technique used to force members to follow certain rules on fear of getting banished or shunned. The Parson also says that he doesn't quibble about what he believed. To quibble means to use invasive, or irrelevant language or arguments to evade an issue. He is described as not seeking pomp, or glory. Pomp is a show of magnificence , and a ceremonial or festive display. 

Allusions

The Parson makes a lot of allusions, mostly referring to the Bible. 

He almost immediately  alludes to the to a writing of Paul to the prophet Timothy. In this writing, Paul discourages people from telling fables, rather than using real life experiences. This is similar to the other travelers telling fables. He also alludes to the biblical stories of Daniel, David, Paul, and Solomon.  

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The parson

by adamjeanlaurent

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Public - 10/13/16, 5:23 PM