Ice Hockey in Sweden

by: Timothy Sample

Ice hockey is believed to have evolved from simple stick and ball games played in the 18th and 19th century United Kingdom

Since its debut at the Lillehammer 1994 Winter Games, the Paralympic version of ice hockey has quickly become one of the largest attractions for spectators. It is fast-paced, highly physical and played by male and female athletes with a physical impairment in the lower part of the body. The sport is governed by the IPC with co-ordination by the IPC Ice Hockey Technical Committee.

Ice hockey tournaments have been staged at the Olympic Games since 1920. The men's tournament was introduced at the 1920 Summer Olympics and was transferred permanently to the Winter Olympic Games program in 1924, in France. The women's tournament was first held at the 1998 Winter Olympics.

Olympic Games were originally intended for amateur athletes until 1988, and the National Hockey League (NHL) did not allow its players to compete until 1998. From 1924 to 1988,

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score points. 

Ice hockey  teams usually consist of 6 players each, 1 goaltender and five players who skate up and down the ice 

trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team

Overtime periods are extra periods beyond the third  scores a goal.

regulation period during a game, where normal hockey rules apply. Although in the that the game ends immediately when a player

past, full-length overtime periods were played, overtimes today are golden goal (a form of sudden death), meaning

 Championship gold medals (1972, 1974, 1977, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1994, and 1998); and one Women European Championship gold medal in 1996.

A 1797 engraving unearthed by Swedish sport historians Carl Gidén and Patrick Houda 

shows a person on skates with a stick and bung on the River Thames, probably in December 1796.[11]


for ice hockey. The Aberdeen Pavilion (built in 1898) in Ottawa was used for ice hockey in 1904 and is the oldest existing facility that has hosted Stanley Cup games.

A 1797 engraving unearthed by Swedish sport historians Carl Gidén and Patrick Houda 

shows a person on skates with a stick and bung on the River Thames, probably in December 1796.[11]

See also: Professional ice hockey, History of the National Hockey League and History of Canadian Hockey

Victoria Rink, built in 1862, was demolished in 1925.[39] Many older rinks succumbed to fire, such as Denman Arena, Dey's Arena, Quebec Skating Rink and Montreal Arena, a hazardlarger rinks. Most of the early indoor ice rinks have been demolished; Montreal's of the buildings' wood construction. The Stannus Street Rink in Windsor, Nova Scotia (built inAs the popularity of ice hockey as a spectator sport grew, earlier rinks were replaced by 1897) may be the oldest still in existence; however, it is no longer used for ice hockey. The Aberdeen Pavilion (built in 1898) in Ottawa was used for ice hockey in 1904 and is the oldest existing facility that has hosted Stanley Cup games.

While the general characteristics of the game stay the same wherever it is played, the exact rules depend on the particular code of play being used. The two most important codes are those of the IIHF[42] and the NHL.[43] Both of the codes, and others, originated from Canadian rules of ice hockey of the early 20th Century.

Ice hockey is played on a hockey rink. During normal play, there are six players per side on the ice at any time, one of them being the goaltender, each of whom is on ice skates. The objective of the game is to score goals by shooting a hard vulcanized rubber disc, the puck, into the opponent's goal net, which is placed at the opposite end of the rink. The players use their sticks to pass or shoot the puck

In Canada, the United States, and some European countries such as Latvia and Sweden, it is known simply as "hockey"; the name "ice hockey" is used in places where "hockey" more often refers to field hockey, such as South America, Asia, Africa, Australasia, and some European countries like Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom. In Russia and Ukraine, where "hockey" also can refer to bandy, ice hockey is often called "hockey with puck".

In international competitions, the national teams of six countries (The "Big Six") predominate: Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, Sweden and the United States. Of the 69 medals awarded all-time in men's competition at the Olympics, only six medals were not awarded to one of those countries. In the annual Ice Hockey World Championships, 177 of 201 medals have been awarded to the six nations. Teams 

outside the "Big Six" have won only five medals in either competition since 1953:[3][4] All 12 Women's Olympic and 36 IIHF World Women's Championships medals have been awarded to one of these six countries, and every gold medal in both competitions has been won by either the Canadian national team or the United States national team.[5][6]

"Ice Hockey." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation

"Ice Hockey at the Olympic Games." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 14 Apr. 2016.

"Ice Hockey." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2016. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_hockey>.

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Ice Hockey in Sweden

by 21ttsample

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Public - 4/13/16, 4:37 PM